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Almond Milk in Korea

Here it is! The packaging really stands out from the other milk in the aisle. It is found on the shelves, not in the refrigerated section.

Here it is! The packaging really stands out from the other milk in the aisle. It is found on the shelves, not in the refrigerated section.



For the past 3 years I’ve been tolerating the soy milk selection in Korea, always wishing for another substitute for dairy milk. I find the soy milk in Korea to be a bit too sweet for me, and I was craving something different. A while back I thought I found real almond milk, only to learn that it had a base of soy and sometimes even dairy milk. I have seen rice milk and almond milk available at some high- end department stores, but the price was too steep for my wallet.

I even tried making my own almond milk at home. The recipe itself is easy to prepare, delicious and free of unwanted additives, however, the shelf life is just a few days. It just seemed like I could never use it fast enough. I still like to make fresh almond milk when I want to enjoy a glass with warm cookies.

When I knew I wanted to do some baking or try out a new cereal, I’d order some dairy-free milk from iHerb.com. But then I’d have it patiently wait.  The selection of “milks” available on the site can’t be beat, so I recommend anyone to check it out for something different.

But now back to Korea… The other day I stumbled upon what appeared to be real almond milk in a small local grocery store. After confirming the ingredient list with a friend, I finally found a 100% almond milk that tastes delicious and is available at most Korean stores. It is about 1000₩ more expensive than the soy milks, but for 3,500₩ it’s a very reasonable price!

It appears that things are changing for the healthier in Korea!

Ingredient List

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Nutritional Information

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7 thoughts on “Almond Milk in Korea

  1. Anyone know where to get an almond milk latte in a cafe in Seoul? My girlfriend is sensitive to lactose and soy. :S This isn’t Vancouver anymore!

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  2. Thank you so much for this info; I will be travelling to Seoul with friends in Oct and one of the friends has a few dietary restrictions. We are planning to stay in the Insadong/Jogno area; where would be a good place to shop for fresh vegetables and fruits, and meat (preferably unseasoned). We did shop for groceries at the Lotte department store when there in 2012. Many thanks for any help you can give! Cheers!

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    • Hi Deborah! I’m glad you found the post useful 🙂

      I’m actually not living in Korea now – I’m studying in Canada….but I love Korea so much and I’m returning again to live in August. So that’s why I haven’t posted anything recently.

      If you’re staying in Jongno, I love the Gwangjang Market. You can buy produce and meats (I don’t eat meat, so I’m not sure if it’s been seasoned). But, you can also eat at the food stalls and try lots of delicious foods cheaply.

      http://discoveringkorea.com/110123/gwangjang-traditional-market-in-seoul/

      I don’t know of any vegetable markets in Insadong though.

      My favourite restaurant in Insadong is https://healthyseoul.wordpress.com/2014/08/03/시천주-restaurant/
      The ingredients are very high quality, seasonal and I think organic? The owner speaks English and is very friendly.

      As for the almond milk….right before I left in August 2014 I started seeing “almond breeze” available is stores. I’m sure you’ll find that things have changed drastically since 2012.

      Have a great time!!

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